why not let 2014 IYFF help to promote broad discussion and cooperation at the national, regional and global levels to increase awareness and understanding of the challenges faced by smallholders and help identify efficient ways to support family farmers through #SOCIALFARMING

Back in December, 2011, the United Nations General Assembly passed a resolution declaring 2014 the UN International Year of Family Farming.

As a proud Donegal social farmer – (Social Farming Across Borders SoFAB Pilot @Lairdhse06 and @leitrimdevco) – I too like my fellow So FAB pilot farmers understand the importance of small family farms as the foundation upon which agriculture has thrived over the centuries. Today in Europe family farming clearly exhibits certain distinct characteristics related to location, needs and priorities and historical and cultural farming circumstances that should be maintained and promoted. One such #innovation today taking shape across Europe’s family farms and fields is called -#SOCIALFARMING.

Here in Ireland today it’s transforming lives and I believe there’s something deeply intuitive about caring for the individual through the care of the land through the SoFAB Project.

As family farms look to survive and grow in the context of globalisation and a changing world #SOCIALFARMING I believe offers a diverse business model opportunity for us in Ireland. #Familyfarm enterprises (like #SOCIALFARMING) are essential to maintain the vitality of rural life and rural services in the Border region (and beyond). Family farms too also display greater resilience by demonstrating willingness and flexibility adapting their traditional businesses to high quality services and produce, engaging in mixed and off-farm activities and/or on farm diversification today.Win win here for all #SOCIALFARMING (family working farms) – not only complements the economic motivation of making this achievable opportunity viable but has social, community, cultural and ecological inherent too.

As the 2014 International Year of Family Farming (IYFF) aims to raise the profile of family farming and smallholder farming by focusing world attention on its significant role in eradicating hunger and poverty, providing food security and nutrition, managing natural resources, protecting the environment, improving livelihoods, and achieving sustainable development, in particular in rural areas let’s put #SOCIALFARMING on the map.

As the goal of the 2014 IYFF is to reposition family farming at the centre of agricultural, environmental and social policies in the national agendas by identifying gaps and opportunities to promote a shift towards a more equal and balanced development, why not let 2014 IYFF help to promote broad discussion and cooperation at the national, regional and global levels to increase awareness and understanding of the challenges faced by smallholders and help identify efficient ways to support family farmers through #SOCIALFARMING

Larry Masterson @blissberryfarm is proud to be part of #SOCIALFARMING SoFAB Project

Learn more from http://www.socialfarmingacrossborders.org

For those participants who struggle, the social farm could be the lifeline.

Social Farming – farm related activities and much more . . .

Have you ever been working in a garden and felt the satisfaction of helping something to grow? Or seen animals grazing in the fields and felt an overwhelming sense of peace?

Social farming provides health, social or educational benefits through the provision of a structured programme of farming-related activities. It is the therapy of bringing people in touch with themselves, each other, their natural environment and restoring a sense of belonging and fulfillment by using nature for the enhancement of psychological wellbeing.

The restorative, health and educational values of farming are beginning to be recognised today.

Social Farms are bringing to participants a sense of well-being and self-worth which many have never experienced before. The connection with animals, with the soil and with Nature can have the most profound impact. Apart from the importance of reconnecting participants with Nature, the soil and where seasonal wholesome food comes from, they can give to participants an experience of growing and an understanding of farming which will serve them throughout their lives, especially when they begin to make decisions as consumers.

For those participants who struggle, the social farm could be the lifeline.

If social farming is an area that you are keen to know more about either in terms of helping us to provide social farming or as a care services group that would benefit from our facilities, please get in touch.

International Year of Family Farming 2014 #IYFF #SOCIALFARMING @Lairdhse06 and @leitrimdevco @IFAmedia

Back in December, 2011, the United Nations General Assembly passed a resolution declaring 2014 the UN International Year of Family Farming.

As a proud Donegal social farmer designate – (Social Farming Across Borders SoFAB Pilot @Lairdhse06 and @leitrimdevco) – I too like my fellow So FAB pilot farmers understand the importance of small family farms as the foundation upon which agriculture has thrived over the centuries. Today in Europe family farming clearly exhibits certain distinct characteristics related to location, needs and priorities and historical and cultural farming circumstances that should be maintained and promoted. One such #innovation today taking shape across Europe’s family farms and fields is called -#SOCIALFARMING.

Here in Ireland today it’s transforming lives and I believe there’s something deeply intuitive about caring for the individual through the care of the land through the SoFAB Project.

As family farms look to survive and grow in the context of globalisation and a changing world #SOCIALFARMING I believe offers a diverse business model opportunity for us in Ireland. #Familyfarm enterprises (like #SOCIALFARMING) are essential to maintain the vitality of rural life and rural services in the Border region (and beyond). Family farms too also display greater resilience by demonstrating willingness and flexibility adapting their traditional businesses to high quality services and produce, engaging in mixed and off-farm activities and/or on farm diversification today.Win win here for all  #SOCIALFARMING (family working farms) – not only complements the economic motivation of making this achievable opportunity viable but has social, community, cultural and ecological inherent too.  

As the 2014 International Year of Family Farming (IYFF) aims to raise the profile of family farming and smallholder farming by focusing world attention on its significant role in eradicating hunger and poverty, providing food security and nutrition, managing natural resources, protecting the environment, improving livelihoods, and achieving sustainable development, in particular in rural areas let’s put #SOCIALFARMING on the map.

As the goal of the 2014 IYFF is to reposition family farming at the centre of agricultural, environmental and social policies in the national agendas by identifying gaps and opportunities to promote a shift towards a more equal and balanced development, why not let 2014 IYFF help to promote broad discussion and cooperation at the national, regional and global levels to increase awareness and understanding of the challenges faced by smallholders and help identify efficient ways to support family farmers through #SOCIALFARMING

Larry Masterson @blissberryfarm is proud to be part of #SOCIALFARMING SoFAB Project

Learn more from www.socialfarmingacrossborders.org

To learn more about the International Year of Family Farming (IYFF), visit the UN’s official IYFF website!

#SOCIALFARMIMG underdeveloped tool for reversing the escalating cost-trends related to healthcare and social inclusion and can provide economic opportunity for farms in a form of diversification

Today social farming in Europe is the therapeutic use of farming practices that provide health, social or educational services for one or a range of vulnerable groups of people.

As an alternative to traditional healthcare, farmers are paid for providing a ‘health service’. Farms, market gardens and woodlands are used as places to provide meaningful activity for a range of client groups (including: those experiencing mental health issues; excluded and disaffected youth; those with alcohol/drug issues; people with special needs and autism; prolific offenders and those on probation; the long-term unemployed).

Social farming can deliver effective health and social care through partnerships between agricultural, social, health, justice and educational agencies.

It provides immediate, simple, cost-effective solutions to targets in health, crime, agriculture and education. It is currently an underdeveloped tool for reversing the escalating cost-trends related to healthcare and social inclusion and can provide economic opportunity for farms as a form of diversification.

In recent years the concept of social farming in England, Scotland and Wales has gained momentum and in the last number of years here in Ireland under our So FAB Project
http://www.socialfarmingaccrossborders.com

Larry Masterson, Social Farmer, Blissberry Farm, Munterneese, Mountcharles, Co.Donegal, Ireland

Phone 00 353 87 7642917

Twitter: @blissberryfarm
Website: https://blissberryfarmmountcharles.wordpress.com

Good countryside fresh air, brown earth and human kindness are the seeds of a new revolution in the way we care for society’s most vulnerable individuals which today is taking shape across Europe’s farms and fields – called SOCIAL FARMING. It’s transforming lives and there’s something deeply intuitive about caring for the individual through the care of the land.

20140618-161018-58218795.jpg

Social Farming SoFAB @lairdhse06 benefiting rural communities @blissberryfarm

Blissberry Farm Mountcharles

Social Farming has come to the attention of an increasing range of rural stakeholders in recent years and numerous examples of social farming activities can be found around the EU-27 Member States. This interest is the result of a growing understanding of the potential role of agricultural and rural resources for enhancing the social, physical and mental well-being of people. At the same time, social farming also represents a new opportunity for farmers to deliver alternative services to broaden and diversify the scope of their activities and multi-functional role in society. This integration between agricultural and social activities can also provide farmers with new sources of income and enhance the image of agriculture in the ‘public eye’.

Joint Thematic Initiative

The NRN Joint Thematic Initiative for Social Farming was launched in December 2009 in response to a proposal from the Italian Rural Network for a group of NRNs to work…

View original post 113 more words

BLISSBERRY SOCIAL FARM & CHANGEMAKERS DONEGAL WORSHOP

Change Makers DONEGAL is offering a FREE Development Education workshop at Blissberry Farm. This workshop will give a general introduction to Development Education and 3 short seminars exploring local and global issues relating to seeds, water and bees.
Mon 27th January 2014 ~ 10am – 2pm Blissberry Social Farm, Doorin Mountcharles.
To book your FREE place please contact Larry Masterson at 087 7642917 or email blissberrysocialfarm@gmail.com

Social Farming Across Borders (SoFab)

SOCIAL FARMING services today in Europe provides improved physical health, social skills development, improved confidence and social integration. Specific mental health benefits for clients today include increased self-esteem, improved mood, increased awareness and increased well- being.

#socialfarming plays an important part in promoting and maintaining good health & well-being at Blissberry Social Farm Mountcharles.

#ecotherapy should be made accessible to our mental health services as a prominent resource to all like the service at Blissberry Farm.

We believe this #innovative service in turn would help to relieve the burden on our Mental Health Services today in Ireland and the wider economy of the financial burden of ill-health throughout this Island.